About Us

Sierra Leone remains one of the poorest countries in the world. Life expectancy is just 46 years for men and 47 years for women. Maternal mortality figures are four times higher than the global average at 890 per 100,000 live births. Almost one in five children don’t reach their fifth birthday. Those with rare and complex conditions face little prospect of getting treatment.

Medical Assistance Sierra Leone developed as a strategic response to the overwhelming need for access to quality health care in Sierra Leone. We work with partners to identify specific strategic areas where an input of resources can begin to save lives immediately, to improve overall health and well-being and contribute to the enhancement of long term capacity within the health sector in Sierra Leone. Improved health enables individuals to meet the vast development challenges facing their families and communities.

The overall goals of MASL’s work in Sierra Leone are:

  1. To reduce maternal mortality. About 2% of women die in childbirth, largely due to lack of services to manage emergency obstetric care, harmful traditional practices, inadequately trained staff, and a weak referral system. These problems are set within the social context of acute poverty and low knowledge levels.
  2. To reduce Child Mortality. Almost every family in Sierra Leone has lost a child to a treatable illness (Seisay 2008). Children are dying from easily treatable illnesses like malaria, pneumonia, diarrhoea, measles and malnutrition. Low cost, well-targeted interventions can save lives.
  3. To facilitate access to treatment for those with chronic, rare or complex medical conditions.There is little specialist provision in Sierra Leone, and conditions that, in other contexts, are manageable with medication and support are often profoundly disabling and can lead to early death.

To achieve these goals we currently carry out the following activities:

Establishing & supporting the first clinical epilepsy service in Sierra Leone

MASL and Dr Lisk of Basildon Hospital established the first clinical epilepsy service in Sierra Leone in February 2010, in collaboration with the Epilepsy Association of Sierra Leone. The network of clinics are in huge demand, and are providing full medication and advice to five thousand people. Click here to find out more about this initiative which has transformed the lives of patients, many of whom have endured multiple daily seizures for over forty years, with no treatment or support.

Sickle Cell Management

In collaboration with the Sickle Cell Carer’s Awareness Network, we have begun supplying young sickle cell patients in Kono District with three types of medication to manage their condition. Around 80% of children with sickle cell disorder die before their 5th birthday. Click here to find out more.

Rehabilitation and Equipping of Rural Clinic

We supported repairs to the Mamanso Sanka Clinic, a large 40 bed rural clinic in Tonkolili which offers support to the community, including pregnant mothers and newborns. This clinic sees about 400 people a week. We support hernia operations at the district hospital for selected patients coming to the clinic and provide essential supplies.

Essential drugs and supplies for satellite mother & baby clinic

We provide essential drugs and equipment to a rural satellite clinic in Kenema Vaogboi, nr Mano Dasse, and distribute mosquito nets for pregnant women, nursing mothers and children under-five.

Spinal Surgery Programme Support

We generate funds for the operations conducted annually by Africa Surgery Inc, who coordinate urgent major spinal surgery for Sierra Leoneans each year in Ghana, carried out by US based surgeons. Most patients are children with TB of the spine (Pott’s Disease). Each operation costs £6500.

Nurse Scholarship

We provide one scholarship for nurse training in Freetown; as a grant criteria, the student will work in the health sector in Sierra Leone for at least as long as the course duration (3 years);

Please click on the thumbnails to view our annual reports:

Annual Report 2011/2012

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Annual Report 2011/2012

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Annual Report 2010/2011